Our RULA Crew

We simply cannot thank them enough for the work they do. They brought so much joy and love into the workplace every single day. Thanks to them, RULA was more than a group of hardworkers, it was a family.

The Ladies

The ladies of Station Nine are amazingly unforgettable . They’re stay-home moms. Almost all of them have  more than one kid.  That’s  pretty shocking because having a kid is expensive enough, what more having more than one?

Nida

One lady named Nida, who eventually became one of RULA’s  team leader, has four kids. Almost every year, she was getting pregnant.

It seemed like almost every mom in the community was getting pregnant. When asked why they were always getting pregnant,  they all giggled and answered there was nothing else to do. In other words, sex was their recreation.

When asked why they were always getting pregnant,  they all giggled and answered there was nothing else to do.

One good way to keep them busy was to teach them how to make bags. That way they wouldn’t end up getting pregnant all the time. This was the safest and the most natural way to teach them birth control. No condoms, no pills, just honest-to-goodness work.

It worked. When Nida got on board, she didn’t get pregnant anymore, Instead, she became one of the team’s leaders, specializing in the sewing part of RULA bag making. 

Daisy

Daisy was in her early twenties when she started out with RULA.  At that time, she already had two kids.

Daisy had dropped out of school. She didn’t have a chance to get to college. It really didn’t seem like it because she had a knack for numbers. She could calculate in her head and come up with the right answers.

She didn’t have a chance to get to college. It really didn’t seem like it to me because she had a knack for numbers. 

Since the patterns of the RULA bags were mostly dependent on numbers, she was an asset. She could calculate everything in her head. She was amazing. 

Daisy passed on when she gave birth to another child. At the time, they weren’t  making bags anymore. She died while giving birth. Her child survived.

The Guys

Here’s the funny part. RULA eventually did not turn out to be the girl-power, small scale, home-based business it was envisioned to be. Some guys in the community actually got on board to do it. They took on the cutting and the folding parts. Everybody was kept busy.

They weren’t  a lot. They were paid per kilo. Since there were a lot of them, it was pretty easy for them to come up with more than just one kilo a day. Nonetheless, it would depend on the number of orders of bags. So  RULA bags had to be marketed intensively.  Daisy, who was in charge of the operations in the community,  would calculate how many kilos of folded, cut, and laminated papers were needed. She was a big help. 

In addition to the extra income, everybody was given the  freedom to use the same process to create their own bags.

Just like any business, their rate was based on the total cost of the bag. Suffice to say, RULA bags weren’t all that expensive. Furthermore, there were sales taxes to be dealt with.  

Nonetheless, everybody in the community was  always grateful for the extra income that came in. In addition to the extra income, everybody was given the  freedom to use the same process to create their own bags. As a matter of fact, some of them were getting orders of their own.  They also made their own bags and proudly paraded them.  Needless to say, they hand crafted quality bags.